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Special Collections

American Mineralogist (Am Min) offers many special themed article collections virtually. Articles that fall within the Special collection are published exactly as any other paper, grouped together by issue, but still published in a timely manner, independent from other articles in the collection. Special collection papers are identified by headings at the top of the article and on the Table of Contents. Click here for more information about organizing or writing for a special collection.

Submit your paper as any regular paper, but choose the correct Special Section from the menu -- and follow all the normal instructions for authors. Author info and journal info available at the Am Min website and papers are submitted via the web at our online submission site.

When the first paper in a collection is published, a link will be here to view the collection. If you wish to have a hard copy of any particular collection, visit MinPubs.org. Hint: hover your mouse over the collection name to view a brief description.

Quick Access: Special Collection Articles


Actinides in Geology, Energy, and the Environment

This collection on mineralogy and the nuclear industry encompasses Cold War legacy issues, specifically the transport of actinides in the subsurface and waste forms for actinides. New research concerning ore deposit genesis, both Th and U, is welcome. They welcome a broad scope!

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Peter C. Burns and Julien Mercadier. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Advances in Ultrahigh-Pressure Metamorphism

We announce the solicitation of papers on the broad spectrum of mineralogical, petrological, and geochemical aspects of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism in crustal rocks. Topics of interest include aspects of UHP mineral nano- and microstructure, crystallography, fluid and melt inclusions; petrology and geochemistry related to UHP topics; and geochronological studies. Papers that present theoretical, analytical or conceptual advances toward the understanding of UHP metamorphism are particularly encouraged.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Jane A. Gilotti, Daniela Rubatto, and Hans-Peter Schertl. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Amorphous Materials: Properties, Structure, and Durability

Spanning several issues of American Mineralogist, this group of papers were among those presented at the Frontiers of Mineral Sciences meeting, Cambridge, 2007

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Grant S. Henderson and Daniel R. Neuville. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Apatite: A common mineral, uncommonly versatile

Residing at the intersection of the biological, geological, and material science realms, the topic of apatite is highly diverse and interdisciplinary. Apatite group minerals are the dominant phosphates in the geosphere and biosphere. They are found in virtually all rock types as the principal sink for P and F and in many cases the (Y+REE). They form the major mineral component in vertebrate bones and are the base of the global phosphorous cycle. U-Th-Pb isotopic chemistry in apatite has lead to their broad application in geochronology. Lastly, the physical and chemical properties of apatite group minerals makes them ideal for many technological applications including phosphors, lasers, prosthetics, ceramics, metal sequestration agents, and potential solid nuclear waste forms.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Dan Harlov and John Hughes. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Applications of Fluid, Mineral, and Melt Inclusions

The growth of crystals in rocks often leads to imperfections in the crystal in the form of fluid, melt, or mineral inclusions. Geological fluids rising from the mantle to the crust acquire, transport, degas, and deposit different elements in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. Numerous studies over the past half-century have described fluid and melt inclusions as the best repositories to investigate changes in inclusion properties and track the evolution of these fluids through time. Recently there has been a growing application of mineral inclusions in rigid hosts to constrain pressures and temperatures of porphyroblast growth. This special section aims to bring together researchers that focus their studies on the application of fluid, mineral, and melt inclusions to understand the nature and timescale of geological processes in different geodynamic environments. Multidisciplinary approaches that combine natural observations, structural and/or deformation paths, laboratory experiments, and theoretical and thermodynamic models are particularly encouraged.

The special collection Associate Editor for these papers is Kyle T. Ashley. Contact Dr. Ashley for information about submitting new papers.

Biomaterials -- Mineralogy meets medicine

Mineralogists are increasingly involved in research into biomaterials. By definition, biomaterials are nonviable materials used in medicine, in particular for medical devices such as endoprosthetic hip or small joint implants or dental roots, intended to interact positively with biological systems such as the human body. This special section acknowledges that mineralogists/materials scientists have much to contribute to this growing field. Mineralogical aspects of biomaterials are of wide interest among mineralogists working in the area of biogenic minerals such as calcite and aragonite. However, they should also interest materials scientists/ceramists involved in the science and technology of bioceramics, both structural materials such as alumina, zirconia and titania, and functional, in particular, osseoconductive materials such as calcium phosphates, especially apatites.

The special collection Associate Editor for these papers is Robert B. Heimann. Contact him for information about submitting new papers.

Building Planets: The dynamics and geochemistry of core formation

Building Planets: The dynamics and geochemistry of core formation aims to combine cutting edge experimental and modeling results with review articles defining the state of the science and current challenges to our understanding of the origin, geophysics and geochemistry of planetary cores. Our goal is to highlight novel and interdisciplinary approaches that address aspects of core formation and evolution at the atomic, grain, and planetary scales.

The Associate Editors for this special section are Tracy Rushmer and Heather Watson. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Chemistry and Mineralogy of Earth's Mantle

Our Special Section in American Mineralogist, titled Chemistry and Mineralogy of Earth's Mantle, will ultimately provide a collection of papers relating to the chemical composition and properties of both the upper and lower mantle. Submissions may be experimental or theoretical in nature, and topics may include concentrations of major and minor elements, bulk mineralogy, phase partitioning, diffusion, and the influence of minor elements on properties such as density, bulk modulus, shear modulus, seismic velocities, anisotropy, and thermal/electrical properties. We are especially interested in papers relating to the incorporation and behavior of minor elements and volatiles into mantle phases, and their impact on rheological properties.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Daniel Hummer and Katherine Crispin. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Dynamics of Magmatic Processes

The aim of this special section is to shed new light on the complexity of magma chamber dynamics processes with a focus on the role of magma mixing and the meaning of measured timescales of magmatic processes. We welcome contributions on the following topics: i) experimental, analogue, geochemical and/or numerical modeling of magma mixing; ii) micro-analytical investigations of physical and chemical disequilibrium in minerals and between minerals and melt; iii) diffusion modeling in melts/minerals and timescale estimation using both elemental diffusion modeling and radiogenic isotopes; iv) analytical, experimental and computational approaches leading to new insights on the timescale of magmatic processes, magma ascent and eruption. An interest in the combination of one or more approaches is encouraged.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Chiara Maria Petrone and Maurizio Petrelli. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Earth Analogs for Martian Geological Materials and Processes

Over the last decade, several steps have been made toward the reconstruction of martian mineralogy, geochemistry, geomorphology, and geology. In situ exploration by rovers, combined with remote sensing and analogue studies, has enabled significant advancement in our understanding of martian chemistry and mineralogy. Terrestrial case studies play an important role in observing geological processes that may have taken place on Mars. This session includes analysis of sites that are consistent with current and former martian environments, as well as sites that may replicate specific chemical, mineralogical, or physical geologic processes that are thought to have taken place on Mars. The present session aims to become a roundtable for Earth and planetary scientists studying terrestrial analogs as case studies of martian geology at all scales. We especially welcome contributions from multidisciplinary approaches, combined field and Mars data analysis studies, and investigations using novel techniques.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Janice Bishop, Javier Cuadros, Christian Mavris and Pablo Sobron. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Earth in Five Reactions: A Deep Carbon Perspective

How do phase transitions and chemical reactions govern the transformation and movement of carbon in Earth? The special collection “Earth in five reactions - A deep carbon perspective” features review articles that use reactions as threads to weave disparate findings into coherent pictures and offer new insights into the role of carbon in Earth's dynamics and evolution. These integrative studies aim to identify gaps in our current understanding and establish new frontiers to motivate and guide future research in deep carbon. Also included are new experimental and theoretical investigations of reactions involving carbon in different host phases, variable valence states, under a wide range of pressure and temperature conditions, and over a vast span of spatial and temporal scales, with the goal of elucidating the mechanisms and kinetics of key reactions that influence Earth's deep carbon cycle.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Jie "Jacky" Li and Simon Redfern. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Fluids in the Crust

Fluids in the Crust is dedicated to high-temperature fluids and fluid-rock interactions. The collection includes analytical, experimental and modeling approaches. The fields of hydrothermal aqueous geochemistry, economic geology, metamorphic geology, igneous petrology and experimental petrology may all fall under the purview of this collection. Studies of rocks and fluids from diverse geologic settings are welcomed, including mid-ocean ridges, subducted slabs, orogenic belts, fumaroles, geothermal fields, and hydrothermal ore deposits.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Dionysis Foustoukos and Sarah Penniston-Dorland. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

From Magmas to Ore Deposits

This collection brings together expertise from the economic geology and igneous petrology communities to track the processes that concentrate volatiles and ore metals from the depths of magmatic systems up through the magmatic-hydrothermal transition and into the ore zone. Interdisciplinary investigation of this complex realm is vital to understand ore deposition and guide exploration. We aim to include any and all aspects of magmatic and magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition, including but not limited to: (1) processes of magma development, (2) source and partitioning of ore metals and volatiles during magma evolution, (3) mechanisms of ore deposition from magmas and/or exsolved magmatic fluids, and (4) optimal conditions for deposition of high-grade deposits versus barren systems (e.g., tectonic setting, lithospheric history, influence of crustal processes, magma/fluid flux, pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, sulfur fugacity, pH, salinity, etc.).

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Celestine Mercer and Julie Roberge. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Geology and Geobiology of Lassen Volcanic National Park

This special collection aims to showcase a broad range of research on the geology of the region surrounding Lassen volcano in the southern Cascades, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the 1916 founding of Lassen Volcanic National Park. Submissions from a wide range of fields including volcanology, petrology, geochemistry, mineralogy, geochronology, geophysics, geobiology, and other related fields are encouraged.

The special collection Associate Editors are Lindsay McHenry and Michael Clynne. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Glasses, Melts, and Fluids, as Tools for Understanding Volcanic Processes and Hazards

At the 2013 Goldschmidt conference held in Florence (August 25-30th), members of the panel on Glasses, Melts, and Fluids as Tools for Understanding Volcanic Processes and Hazards are invited to submit their papers to a special American Mineralogist Collection. This Special Collection aims to bring together studies on natural systems, experimental activities, and thermodynamic modeling, aimed at advancing our understanding of important issues in petrology and chemical volcanology, such as (i) equilibrium vs. disequilibrium degassing processes, (ii) the interplay of magma degassing (including fluid infiltration) and crystallization; (iii) the timing of magmatic processes, (iv) the redox response of magmas in pre-eruptive and syn-eruptive processes, and (v) the link between glass chemical inhomogeneities and magma properties.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Claudia Cannatelli, Roberto Moretti, Rosario Esposito, and Nicole Metrich. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

High-Grade Metamorphism, Anatexis, and Granite Magmatism

This is a collection of papers focused on the nature and timing of processes that form granite magmas, the processes that connect these magmas at their source region with high-level granitic intrusions or their volcanic equivalents, the role of the Earth's mantle in the genesis of granite magmas, and the implications for crustal growth and crustal differentiation. The collection is particularly intended to present the new approaches and techniques currently used to advance in the knowledge of these fundamental topics. Dr. Acosta-Vigil will also rely on the advice and reviewer expertise of Richard White, who will join him as an associate editor when the workload rises.

The special collection Associate Editor for these papers is Antonio Acosta-Vigil, with the advice and reviewer expertise of Richard White, as needed. Contact him for information about submitting new papers.

Investigating Petrologic Indicators of Magmatic Processes in Volcanic Rocks

This collection will be a thematic collection of papers based on a session at AGU 2012. This collection will incorporate exciting new research that combines the most recent advances deciphering vesicles, crystal and melt behavior in eruption-forming magmas.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Thomas Shea, Jessica Larsen, and Julia Hammer. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Isotopes, Minerals, and Petrology: Honoring John Valley

This collection will be a thematic group of papers based in part on a session at the 2017 annual meeting of GSA: "Celebrating Dr. John W. Valley's Contributions to Isotope Geochemistry and Beyond, from the Hadean to the Holocene". We seek contributions in honor of the career of John Valley, who has advanced applications of isotope geochemistry in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary petrology, planetary science, paleoclimatology, gemology, astrobiology, and other disciplines.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Jade Star Lackey and Aaron Cavosie. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Lithium, Beryllium and Boron: Quintessentially Crustal

Since their nuclei are fragile and easily destroyed in stars, Li, Be, and B are three of the least abundant elements lighter than Fe in the solar system, 5 to 7 orders of magnitude less abundant than C, N, and O. Yet the processes leading to the formation of continental crust, such as the subduction cycle, have led to localized enrichments sufficient to saturate such systems with minerals where Li, Be, and B are essential structural constituents. Study of such minerals can thus enhance our understanding of crust formation and elucidate the fate of subducted crust. Lithium and B each have two naturally occurring isotopes that further add to the usefulness of Li and B minerals as tracers. Lithium and B also occur in two crystallographic coordinations with oxygen, and the contrast between them may allow us to distinguish different pressure-temperature regimes. All three elements have also found wide economic applications, and several of the minerals themselves are valuable as gemstones. For this special section, we envision a very broad scope, and we will consider manuscripts that touch upon any of these facets of light element mineralogy-petrology-geochemistry.

The special collection Associate Editor for these papers is Edward S. Grew. Contact Dr. Grew for information about submitting new papers.

Mantle Plumes: Sources, dynamics and volcanic expression

From the formation of large igneous provinces with their impact on climate and life to the eruption of modern ocean islands, thermochemical mantle upwellings known as plumes have played a fundamental role in the evolution of our planet. Over billions of years, plumes have moderated the heat and material fluxes through the mantle, and created land that has been accreted to continents. As plumes are thought to rise from great depths, plume-fed volcanism offers the outstanding opportunity to study deep-mantle composition and evolution. However, decades after the existence of plumes was first proposed, a comprehensive understanding of these important dynamical features as well as detailed illumination by geophysical methods remains elusive. The goal of this special volume is to bring together contributions from different disciplines in order to evaluate the sources, dynamics and evolution of mantle plumes, plume-lithosphere interaction, melt generation, and volcanism. We welcome submissions from geochemistry, petrology, mineralogy, geodynamics and seismology, and other fields of geophysics.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Esteban Gazel and Maxim Ballmer. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Martian Rocks and Minerals: Perspectives from Rovers, Orbiters, and Meteorites

This collection will include papers dealing with observations made by the MER or MSL rovers, orbital multispectral or hyperspectral data, and results based on new studies of martian meteorites. The current focus of much of this work is on understanding the influence of water in past environments and the rock types and geologic record contained in rocks and minerals at the martian surface.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Brad Jolliff, David J. Des Marais, and Bill Farrand. Please contact Brad Jolliff if you would like to contribute a paper.

Mechanisms, rates, and timescales of geochemical transport processes in the crust and mantle

We announce a special collection of American Mineralogist based on recent and forthcoming conference sessions on kinetically and transport controlled geochemical processes in the middle and lower crust and mantle. Currently the element fluxes and timescales of atmospheric, sedimentary, and volcanic processes can be measured, but similar knowledge of mid-crustal to mantle processes remains elusive. We solicit papers on the description and quantitative interpretation of spatial patterns in mineral occurrence (especially metasomatic zoning), in mineral texture, and in the chemical and isotopic compositions of minerals that constrain the mechanisms (e.g., diffusion vs. advection), rates, and timescales of the controlling phenomena. Contributions from field and experimental studies, as well as theory and modeling, are welcome. Please use the subject area tag Geochemical Transport when submitting your paper via the online submission site and look for the special collection name in the drop down list.

The Associate Editors for this special section are Thomas Mueller, Ralf Milke, and John Ferry. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Minerals in the Human Body

This special collection, devoted to various topics relating to minerals in the human body. This collection sets out to examine the interaction, formation, and alteration of minerals in the human body. Past publications in this journal have mainly dealt with characterization of potentially asbestiform minerals, but others (e.g., Guthrie 1992; Norton and Gunter 1999; and Pasteris et al. 1999) have examined broader issues. It's our hope to show how mineralogists, petrologists, and geochemists can aid in this area, while including papers from others outside of the geosciences involved with this issue (e.g., medical researchers and those working in the regulatory fields).

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Mickey Gunter and Gregory Meeker. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Microporous materials: Crystal-chemistry, properties, and utilizations

Microporous materials are a class of compounds with open-framework structures, mainly represented by zeolites, feldspathoids and materials with heteropolyhedral frameworks. Many of these structures hold a variety of cations and molecules within structural cavities in their open structures. Interest in this class of materials is growing, and there has been an explosion of studies over the last decades on their occurrence, synthesis routes, properties and applications. Both natural and synthetic varieties exist, and they represent the intersection between mineralogy and material science. The aim of this special collection devoted to microporous materials is to assemble contributions on the crystal-chemistry, properties and utilizations of natural open-framework compounds and their synthetic counterparts, emphasizing the connections between mineralogy and materials engineering.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are G. Diego Gatta and Paolo Lotti. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Nanominerals and Mineral Nanoparticles

Nanocrystalline minerals are ubiquitous in natural systems. They are characterized for having coherent domain sizes in the nanometer range, high specific surface areas and, usually, colloidal properties. All these properties make them important environmental sinks of pollutants and contaminants, as well and vectors for the colloidal transport of contaminants in the environment. The high density of broken bonds at their surfaces often allows for exceptional catalytic activity, and their frequent imperfect stoichiometry, that results from low-temperature and (or) of biogenic crystallization often leads to the presence of mixed-valent structures that possess a redox potential allowing for the degradation of molecules such as organics. On the other hand, mineral nanoparticles--the 'nano' version of bulk minerals--can form as the result of weathering or dissolution processes, under conditions of limited mineral growth, or even as transient phases during biotic and abiotic mineral formation processes. The advent of advanced characterization techniques for the detection of nanominerals and mineral nanoparticles in natural systems, as well as for their structural study has extended the now well established nanotechnology approaches to the mineralogical science. In this special issue we invite contributions dealing with the study of nanominerals and mineral nanoparticles, including their occurrences in different natural settings, their structural characterization and their reactivity.

The special collection editors are Alejandro Fernandez-Martinez, David M. Singer, and Sylvain Grangeon. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

New Advances in Subduction Zone Magma Genesis

This is a special collection devoted to the dynamic research field of magma genesis at convergent margins. Magmatism at the Earth's subduction zones generates volatile-rich andesitic magmas that intrigue geoscientists by their compositional resemblance to continental crust, their role in recycling of solid Earth materials and their volatile-rich, explosive eruptions that can influence climate. This Special Section seeks contributions that address recent advances with respect to recycled slab materials (subducted oceanic crust, serpentinitized mantle) and eroded upper plate crust, primary melt composition (basaltic or silicic or both?), timescales, mass transfer and mechanisms of slab-to-surface transfer (fluids? silicic melts? mélange diapirs?) all of which control the elemental transfer from slab to surface and beyond. Case studies and conceptual approaches from all disciplines are welcome, including field studies, geochemistry, mineralogy, experimental petrology and geophysical approaches ranging from fluid dynamics to seismology.

The Associate Editors for this special section are Susanne M. Straub and Heather Handley. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Perspectives on Origins and Evolution of Crustal Magmas

This collection will be a thematic group of papers based on two sessions at the 2013 Annual meeting of GSA. This collection will incorporate new research on cutting-edge approaches to the study of crustal magmas and syntheses that place modern research concepts in an historical context.

The special collection editors are Calvin Miller and Cal Barnes. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Planetary Processes as Revealed by Sulfides and Chalcophile Elements

Most metals in the periodic table occur naturally within sulfides, making them important minor constituents of igneous rocks. There is thus an increasing interest in the behavior of these metals in magmatic and hydrothermal systems of Earth and other terrestrial planets, relative to their use in unraveling the magmatic history of planetary objects. In this section, we invite submissions on the petrological and geochemical investigations into the behavior of sulfides and chalcophile elements in magmatic and hydrothermal systems. This section will combine experimental and modeling studies with studies of natural samples to address fundamental processes, such as planetary accretion and core-mantle segregation, the addition of siderophile and chalcophile elements during the late veneer stage of accretion, the budget of chalcophiles in the upper mantle, and the behavior and global cycling of chalcophile elements in subduction zones.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Kate Kiseeva and Raúl Fonseca. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Physics and Chemistry of Earth’s Deep Mantle and Core

Recent geophysical observations have revealed that the Earth’s deep mantle and core are more complex than previously thought. Geodynamical and geochemical studies have extensively explored the dynamic evolution of the Earth’s silicate mantle and metallic core through the geological time. Physical and chemical properties of materials are fundamental information for interpretation of the observations and for constructing robust models. In this special collection, we focus on the physics and chemistry of the Earth’s deep mantle and core to better understanding the current nature and dynamic processes of the Earth’s deep interior. This collection seeks to attract contributions from both experimental and theoretical/computational mineral physics studies of deep Earth materials. Topics include, but are not limited to, phase relations, thermodynamics, elasticity, EOS, crystal chemistry, transport and rheological properties. We also welcome contributions from seismology, geodynamics, and geochemistry to provide a unified view of deep Earth that could guide research in mineral physics.

The special collection editors are Ryosuke Sinmyo and Zhicheng Jing. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Planetary Processes as Revealed by Sulfides and Chalcophile Elements

Most metals in the periodic table occur naturally within sulfides, making them important minor constituents of igneous rocks. There is thus an increasing interest in the behavior of these metals in magmatic and hydrothermal systems of Earth and other terrestrial planets, relative to their use in unraveling the magmatic history of planetary objects. In this section, we invite submissions on the petrological and geochemical investigations into the behavior of sulfides and chalcophile elements in magmatic and hydrothermal systems. This section will combine experimental and modeling studies with studies of natural samples to address fundamental processes, such as planetary accretion and core-mantle segregation, the addition of siderophile and chalcophile elements during the late veneer stage of accretion, the budget of chalcophiles in the upper mantle, and the behavior and global cycling of chalcophile elements in subduction zones.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Kate Kiseeva and Raúl Fonseca. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Rates and Depths of Magma Ascent on Earth

In recent years, significant advances have been made in deciphering the rates of magmatic processes for a variety of magmatic systems, from small-scale mafic eruptions to felsic supereruptions. Timescales range from millennia to minutes, depending on the dating method employed and the magmatic system investigated. Large efforts have also been made in experimental determination of the pre-eruptive conditions for a variety of magmas from different volcanic settings, with depths of magma storage ranging from subcrustal to shallow crustal levels. This collection will bring together contributions that elucidate magma ascent rates to their ultimate storage depths (if storage occurs) and to the surface at the onset of eruption, and that provide tight constraints on the magma source. The papers employ a multitude of techniques that can provide insights on problems of magma thermobarometry, the timescales of magma transfer, remobilization, and eruption on Earth.

The special collection editors are Georg Zellmer and Renat Almeev. Submissions are in process now -- contact the editors if you would like to contribute.

Special Collection: Olivine

Olivine is the dominant mineral in Earth’s upper mantle, and is a major phenocryst phase in mafic magmas. Thus, olivine-based studies provide a crucial perspective for understanding mantle and magmatic processes, as well as the role of mantle-derived magmas in crustal evolution. In recognition of the importance of olivine to understanding earth processes, a special session of Goldschmidt 2014 focused on this mineral. Papers are sought for this special issue that utilize the olivine perspective to examine mantle and magmatic processes including minor and trace element compositions of olivine, diffusion studies, thermobarometry of olivine-bearing systems, and olivine-bearing melt and/or fluid inclusions. Contributions that carry implications for olivine-bearing systems (e.g. redox equilibria) are also welcome.

The special collection editors are Michael Garcia and Bruce Watson. Submissions are in process now -- contact Mike or Bruce if you would like to contribute.

Spinels Renaissance: The past, present, and future of those ubiquitous minerals and materials

This is a special collection, focused on diverse topics, related to the structure, properties, and applications of natural and synthetic spinels and spinelloids. The collection aims to document the revival of interest in spinel materials, with emphasis on non-oxygen containing and nanosized structures. The hope to bring together experimental and theoretical research studies from mineralogists, crystallographers, petrologists, chemists, materials scientists, physicists, and other spinel aficionados.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Kristina Lilova, Kaimin Shih, Hiroshi Kojitani, and Ferdinando Bosi. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

The Second Conference on the Lunar Highlands Crust and New Directions

This issue will focus on a core group of overview papers that summarize the major topics explored at the Second Conference on the Lunar Highlands Crust in 2012. In the spirit of this interdisciplinary meeting, we encourage collaborative efforts, particularly between co-authors from diverse sub disciplines, but would welcome any contributions related to topics presented at the meeting. Papers undergo normal peer review, and as papers are accepted, they are published. Short title: Lunar Highlands Revisited.

The special collection Associate Editors are Rachel Klima and Peter Isaacson. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Understanding paleo-ocean proxies: insights from in situ analyses

Characterizing the bulk geochemistry of trace elements and their isotopes in sedimentary rocks has been used as the favored approach for the last two decades to investigate the chemistry of ancient oceans. However, diagenetic and metamorphic processes may complicate the interpretation of the paleo proxy records (concentration and isotope), mostly because of their heterogeneous distributions among the different mineral (and organic) phases. Applying in situ analyses at micro and nano scales can overcome this challenge. In this section, we will provide a collection of experimental and theoretical papers that will examine in situ trace element geochemistry in sediments and most importantly whether our interpretation of the bulk geochemical approach remains valid.

The special collection Associate Editor is Daniel Gregory. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Understanding of Reaction and Deformation Microstructures

Over the past few decades mineral microstructures from nano- to centimeter-scale have become an indispensable tool in unravelling tectonometamorphic histories including conditions of deformation and reactions. Analytical and experimental advances along with new numerical capabilities have made this possible.

We welcome contributions that apply quantitative microstructural characteristics to the understanding of fundamentals of processes within the 's lithosphere and/or show examples of exciting new methods for characterizing microstructures that (promise to) give advanced insight into how microstructures develop and evolve through time, reflecting their influence on large-scale geodynamic processes. We welcome contributions from disperse fields such as structural geology/petrology/microstructures, volcanology, including field studies and/or laboratory experiments and/or numerical modeling. We hope that this special collection will provide a state-of-the art collection of original works highlighting the exciting new insights and future perspectives of modern mineral physics across the Earth Sciences.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Patrick Cordier and Sandra Piazolo. Contact them for information about submitting new papers.

Versatile Monazite: Resolving Geological Records and Solving Challenges in Materials Science

This collection was based on a session at the Fall 2011 GSA meeting. Submissions on this topic to continue the conversation are welcome as part of the scope and mission of American Mineralogist articles.

The special collection Associate Editors for these papers are Callum Hetherington and Gregory Dumond. Submissions on this topic to continue the conversation are welcome as part of the scope and mission of American Mineralogist articles.

Volatile Elements in Differentiated Planetary Interiors

Volatile elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and the halogen group elements play an important role in the dynamics, structure, and evolution of terrestrial planets. In particular, volatile elements within the interior of a differentiated planetary body can influence a wide range of chemical and physical properties including redox state, conductivity, rheology, viscosity, melting, shock, degassing and the partitioning of other elements. Papers that address the role of volatile elements in planetary interiors, including the cycling of volatile elements within the Earth or the interaction between surface and mantle reservoirs in differentiated bodies, the stability of volatile element-bearing phases at extreme pressure-temperature conditions, the behavior of volatile elements from surface to core, and the influence of volatile elements on planetary-scale processes within the Earth and other terrestrial bodies are particularly encouraged.

The special collection Associate Editors are Anne H. Peslier and Elizabeth C. Thompson. Submissions are in process now -- contact the editors if you would like to contribute.

Water in Nominally Hydrous and Anhydrous Minerals

This special section is focussed on different aspects of water in hydrous and nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) in crust and mantle with special respect to recent analytical and experimental developments. Applications of new theoretical, analytical and experimental approaches for characterizing water in the minerals as well as contributions addressing the storage, speciation and quantifying water in minerals at different physico-chemical conditions are encouraged. The special section also aims to discuss the effect of water on the chemical and physical properties of minerals and their relation to geodynamics.

The special collection Associate Editors are Roland Stalder, Nathalie Bolfan-Casanova, and Istvan Kovacs. Submissions are in process now -- contact the editors if you would like to contribute.

What Lurks in the Martian Rocks and Soil? Investigations of Sulfates, Phosphates, and Perchlorates

Papers from 2012 AGU session: Sulfates, phosphates, and perchlorates have been found on Mars from orbit and/or from surface missions. Identification of these minerals (suites) can enable constraints on the Martian geochemical environments. This session will generate a discussion regarding the conditions for the formation of these minerals on Mars, and methods for identifying their geological environments and related fluid chemistry. Abstracts describing discoveries of sulfates, phosphates, or perchlorates from surface missions and orbital spacecraft data, and those covering laboratory analyses and thermodynamic modeling relating to the hydration state of these minerals and their stability on Mars are included. Submissions on this topic to continue the conversation are welcome as part of the scope and mission of American Mineralogist articles. Short title: Martian Rocks and Soil.

The special collection Associate Editors were Darby Dyar, Melissa Lane, and Janice Bishop. Submissions on this topic to continue the conversation are welcome as part of the scope and mission of American Mineralogist articles.


American Mineralogist Special Issues Archive

Petrologic Mineralogy: Guidotti Memorial

In honor of Charles V. Guidotti (1935-2005)

Feb-March 2008

Microbeam Cathodoluminescence

Recent developments in microbeam cathodoluminescence with applications to mineralogy


Feb-March 2007

Planetary Materials: From the Earth to the Moon and Beyond

Oct 2006

W.G. Ernst Commemorative Issue

May/June 2005

Monazite Geochronology

April 2005

Clathrate Hydrates

August 2004